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Non-judgemental reminder that both ableist terms and slurs have histories (and present-day realities) behind them, and can hurt despite best intentions (or not, depending)

autistichoya.com/p/ableist-wor

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I try to balance letting some of it slide, so I don't come off as policing people (which isn't the intent or goal, including on a community level), but sometimes it kicks over into "ok, my brain just went numb" territory, so...yeah.

Even with that, one common intent (which I agree with) in the disability rights community is to make people more aware of the actual history behind a lot of these words, because they are used to justify harmful policies, to the letter.

The language may have changed, or at times, not -- but the practices are still very much with us.

In other words, it's not about policing usage, or free speech, or any of that -- it's about how language and rhetoric is used to discriminate against, police and harm disabled people. Including culturally, in social policies, and legally.

@shoutcacophony
Nonjudgemental reminder that lists of words and phrases to not use are also ableist because some of us have language disabilities that make it hard to replace words, especially when the "replacement" would be a lot more words that just using that one word.

@certifiedperson All true, ty. That's another reason to not police people over it.

I had a friend slide into my DMs to correct me one time over word usage along these lines (for a word that gets used often enough that it kept echoing in my head), and they were pointed enough about it that I got triggered and started melting down.

@certifiedperson

Not because it was anything unusual (although they were right in terms of the criticism, even if their delivery was unfair), but on general principle.

Which sort of defeats the point

@certifiedperson This is what Lydia Brown said in the link I posted regarding usage of the list:

"You're not automatically a bad or evil person/activist if you have used random language on here, but if you have the cognitive/language privilege to adjust your language, it's definitely worthwhile to consider becoming more aware/conscious of how everyday language helps perpetuate ableist ideas and values."

@certifiedperson

I agree with why Lydia made the list, including what they're asserting in relation to language privilege. That said, if someone is expecting someone to "overcome their disability" or whatever to use anti-oppression tools, that's not ok (and not what Lydia is asking from people, imo). It's an awareness campaign, not an excuse to police or "drag" people.

@shoutcacophony
Yeah absolutely, i probably could've been a bit clearer. I kinda wanted to mention it because i have seen that exact list spread by people who are picky about language use, and because a that list starts out with a lot of text beforehand, it's really easy to miss those disclaimers even if one does read it all.

So i guess i was just trying to make that part super clear, maybe could've gone about that better.

@certifiedperson more than fair. i know that being picky in that way is a common assertion, as well as there being other similar assertions, and it's both valid and important to point out. thanks.

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